Let’s Talk about Animals: Horowitz on Palestinian Words and Deeds

Ellen Horowitz has written a piece on the contradictions between Palestinian accusations of Israeli brutality and their own deeds from the perspective of an Israeli. One could find fewer illustrations of the Palestinian demopathic mindset at work. I would welcome references to a Palestinian perspective that addresses this problem of the pot calling the kettle black.

This is the definitive, linked and illustrated version of this article, which has been published at Israeli Insider.

Let’s Talk About Animals
November 9, 2006
Ellen W. Horowitz

It’s been a bad week for Arab women and children.

Sunday started out with a horrific report on the grisly discovery of a missing four year old boy. He was found dead in a garbage dumpster in the Beduin city of Rahat.

The father of the young boy reported that one of his wives (he has three of them) had stabbed to death the child of another wife, because she was jealous and unable to conceive.

Police believe that at first the child’s body was stored in the washing machine, but was later dumped in the garbage.

On Monday, a female suicide bomber blew herself up near Israeli soldiers in Beit Hanoun. Lucky for us, she goes to paradise a bit unaccomplished after having only lightly wounded one our soldiers.

That same day the Jerusalem Post reported that an all-women’s cell of Islamic Jihad terrorists was discovered and apprehended. The women were handlers of several terror cells in the areas of Jerusalem and Judea. Among other activities, they were involved in the transferring of funds from Syria to be used for the families of suicide terrorists, and for the funding of terror attacks. One of the arrested women also oversaw the building of an explosives laboratory. The less capable women have been relegated to the position of acting as human shields for terrorists – but hey, it’s a job.

And just when you thought that equal opportunity employment for women had been embraced by the Palestinian patriarchal society (at least in the terror sector), a scathing report from Human Rights Watch on the status of Palestinian women came to the fore on Tuesday.

According to one article, the Palestinian Authority’s Central Bureau of Statistics reported that 23 percent of Arab women living in PA-controlled areas have experienced domestic violence, and sixty-six percent said they were subject to psychological abuse at home.

The report also cited that the situation is exacerbating due to the fact that the abusers are granted virtual immunity under Islamic law.

Which brings us to Wednesday’s accidental artillery shelling, by the IDF, of an alleged civilian area in Beit Hanoun. As of this writing, the jury is still out on who, how, how many, when, and what occurred. And then there’s always the very enigmatic Arab reaction. Based on the Islamic worldview, I’m not sure if the event constitutes wholly bad news. On one hand there’s always a glut of wailing women images and morbid, heartrending photo ops provided to the press – followed by cries for revenge.

doll\'s head
Photograph from Beit Hanoun in al Jazeera (which apparently still has no standards, even after Reutersgate).

But, on the other hand, the mothers of the alleged victims seem rather pleased – at least in the interviews.

Reporters quoted one mother who purportedly lost four children as saying: “I am proud to be the mother of the shahids, it is a great honor and we pray to Allah to compensate us.”

After a week like this, you¹ll forgive me if I thought it was funny – in macabre sort of way – when Palestinian Government Spokesman Dr. Ghazi Hamad said that “Israel is not a country of humans, but of animals”. For the record, he also mentioned that Israel must be wiped off the face of the earth, but that’s not news – we’ve been hearing it a lot lately.

But Dr. Hamad, if we Israeli animals are wiped off the map, then who would care for and treat your wounded that we receive at Israeli hospitals?

I’m not sure why our fuzzy little friends in the animal kingdom get such a bad rap by us human types. Animals are instinctive, not conniving creatures. I suppose the accurate term to describe more-than-barbaric behavior would be “subhuman”. But somehow, when we hear of the carrying out of some ghastly cruelty, we naturally and instinctively gasp and exclaim under our breath, “those animals!”

Throughout the last several years of world-wide carnage, I’ve had a lot of those catch my-breath-at-barbarism opportunities. But the quintessential animal moment for me came on October 12, 2000. Two of our reserve soldiers accidentally took the wrong turn and ended up being more-than-brutally lynched in the Palestinian Police compound of Ramallah (remember the picture with the bloody hands?)

bloody hands

When the wife of one of the reservists called her husband’s celphone, it was picked up by the butchers who informed the woman, “We are killing your husband.”

Since then we’ve watched everything from Arabs playing football with body parts, to beheadings in realtime, to the deliberate and calculated mass immolation of civilians in the name of Allah.

In fact anyone who still has the capacity and sensitivity to gasp, and turn away from the glut of savagery brought upon us by global Jihad, must be a highly evolved individual.

Then there are those, in the international community, who are so good at feigning outrage – it comes with the job. International leaders were leaping to conclusions, before an accurate account of the incident had been reported, or an investigation had been completed. They rely instead on ghastly eyewitness accounts accompanied by images of corpses, funeral pyres, morgue refrigerators, and the operating theater. Normally that would be pretty good evidence to base a report on, but in Pallywood these things require verification by investigation.

In the past, on more than one occasion, these images have been fabricated or arranged for dramatic effect – We saw this theater of lies with Al Dura, Jenin, Rafah, Gaza Beach, and Qana. One can almost assume that the mishap at Beit Hanoun, whether authentic or not, could likely have a good dose of Pallywood mixed in with the tragic facts.

The Foreign Minister of Italy called the incident a “massacre” . He must be taking lessons from the Palestinians who have a tendency to describe everything in those terms or worse.

Back in the summer of 2004 when Israel destroyed some buildings in Rafah which were used as a cover for sophisticated weapon¹s smuggling tunnels emanating from Egypt, the Mayor of Rafah compared the incident to the bombing of Hiroshima.

And instead of the top wire service acting responsibly, by questioning the mayor’s delusional perspective, the Associated Press proceeded to disseminate the report (it’s worth noting that the deputy mayor’s reference to Israel as a Nazi state which perpetrated a holocaust, also went over the news wire).

The European Union described the recent incident at Beit Hanoun as “a profoundly shocking event.” True enough. But it would be a profoundly intelligent move on EU’s part if they would take a real penetrating look into what kind of culture their generous funds to the Palestinians have been fostering. A thorough re-assessment of their policies would be in Europe’s best interest, as the flames of Jihad that the EU has been fueling appear to be spreading in their direction.

global pot

It would be profoundly inspiring if the EU, instead of conveniently pointing the finger at Israel, would challenge and pressure the Arab world to try and raise themselves up from their current monstrous standing, to the level of animals – even primitive ones. Then maybe we would have somebody to talk to. But we’re most likely talking about years of evolution.

It’s profoundly idiotic that Israel continues to use the same repeatedly failed formula when approaching libelous accusations with regards to her defensive actions:

a) We instantaneously issue an apology before investigating the occurrence.
I suppose we do this in order to placate the feeding frenzy of the press – which is so very pressed to be first to deliver the goods to a salivating public.
b) Once the exonerating facts are in, we fall all over ourselves in bumbling attempts to set the record straight.

And how does one gracefully retract an apology?
This kind of foolishness makes re-runs of the Three Stooges look like serious drama.

As Caroline Glick rightfully pointed out, in a Jerusalem Post column covering the Al Dura trials two weeks ago, “When Israel refuses to defend itself from blood libels, it gives silent license to attacks against Israel and world Jewry in the name of those libels.”

But it’s worth noting that despite an incompetent government response to a public relations crisis, the Israeli Defense Forces have a sense of conscious and accountability, and they try ever-so-hard to maintain the moral high ground in an insanely brutal region.

The same cannot be said of the Palestinian leadership. When faced with the prospect of condemning terror attacks, Yasser Arafat used to go through almost humorous verbal gymnastics and conniptions to avoid the task.

If love is defined as “never having to say you’re sorry”, then I guess the Palestinian authority, the EU and the UN must love us a lot – because they never have to apologize.

But remember, Dr. Ghazi Hamad, we Israelis – with all of our faults – are far more human than the rest of you. Because animals wouldn’t treat your wounded, nor sincerely investigate a possible mishap, nor apologize when necessary. It seems you, the EU, and the rest the world should do their best to keep us on the map. Because I have a hunch that without Israel, you men (joined by your women and children) would have torn each other to shreds long ago.

—-

The writer lives in the Golan Heights and is the author of The Oslo Years: A Mother’s Journal (Distributed by Gefen Publishing).

22 Responses to Let’s Talk about Animals: Horowitz on Palestinian Words and Deeds

  1. Eliyahu says:

    I like your cartoon, Ellen, but as to the “human rights” watch report, I don’t think that it mentioned Islam explicitly. It did say something like “local laws do not favor prosecution of persecutors of women,” or some such. I read excerpts from the hrw report on jihad watch.

  2. Eliyahu says:

    there is of course a huge amount of double standards motivating the EU response to the Beyt Hanun deaths. Seven years ago NATO pilots in Kossovo dropped bombs on a group of Kossovo Albanians, the very people whom they had supposedly gone to war to protect. About 80 of them were killed. The NATO spokesman, a Scotsman named something like Jamey Shea, told the press: “The poilet drupped the bombs in gude fayeth.” How come good faith isn’t attributed to the Israeli soldiers?

    Run into a similar phenomenon at the level of the media — Israeli information is subjected to the most stringent level of scrutiny and often dismissed as propaganda even when accurate; Palestinian information swallowed whole both from the PA and from the “stringers” all of whom are working for the PA. The question is, how to effectively challenge such a travesty of fairness?

  3. Ellen says:

    Hi Eliyahu,
    Thanks for the postive feedback on the cartoon.
    I’m also reviewing the various news items on the report. It does appear that Islamic law and Arab culture is in the way of reforms. Will keep you posted if I can find something substantial. The Khaleej Times Online had an review of the report:

    (Excerpts)

    It said families, tribal leaders and authorities, backed by tradition and discriminatory laws, often sacrifice victims’ interests for family honor.’

    Independent legislator Hanan Ashrawi said it’s unlikely more progressive legislation will be passed by a parliament dominated by the Islamic Hamas. We don’t have a majority for reforms on these issues,’ she said.

    http://www.khaleejtimes.com/DisplayArticleNew.asp?xfile=data/middleeast/2006/November/middleeast_November104.xml&section=middleeast

  4. Loki says:

    All animals are equal but some animals are more equal that others? But we are all innocent aren’t we…abstract death or killing at a distance is far more humane and civilized than getting in and getting your hands dirty?

    And you live in the Golan Heights? Interesting bit of property there….have any title deeds? What are they worth?

    Probably the same as a Palestinians title deeds are worth in Gaza or the West bank…

  5. GourneyLoki says:

    Richard – Are you referring to Ellen Horowitz as a ‘demopath’?

    cute. i’ve corrected the ambivalent referent.

  6. Jack says:

    It makes me feel sick inside.

  7. Loki says:

    Seriously I’m confused…Why isn’t Ellen Horowitz representative of a demopathic mindset? Seriously

    “Are far more human than the rest of you”???
    Really? Any DNA Genome testing to back that up?

  8. RL says:

    you may, if you like, object to her remarks (should she have said humane?), but then presumably you would be still more indignant at the flood of dehumanizing accusations emanating from the Palestinians… or do you hold a double standard where Palestinian demonization is the understandable result of their desperation, but the slightest misphrasing — bouncing off the Palestinian accusation of Israelis as animals — is unbearable from an Israeli? (your implication of racism — DNA — is just rhetoric; it’s not about race but culture, and the evidence is in behavior).

    in any case, i would say that Ellen’s pride at belonging to a culture that treats its enemy wounded (including terrorists), sincerely investigates a possible mishap, and apologizes when necessary, all suggest someone dedicated to a very high level of civic commitment.

    it’s the people who behave worse than animals and accuse their enemies of behaving like animals that are the demopaths, and the people who believe them, sympathize with their depraved violence as “resistance” who are the dupes.

    where are you in all this?

  9. Tuesday Morning Links

    Canada takes a step forward towards permitting smoking in schools. Blue Crab. Teacher, I can’t think without my cigarettes.From Boortz (h/t, Instap):It is clear that something is terribly wrong in Washington right now.  We just went through an electi…

  10. 5th of November says:

    Iraq and Palestine are bloody, violent diversions. As the US army attacks Iraq, the US gov’t erodes rights at home by suspending habeas corpus, stealing private lands, banning books like “America Deceived” from Amazon, rigging elections, conducting warrantless wiretaps and starting 2 illegal wars based on lies. Soon, another US false-flag operation will occur (sinking of an Aircraft Carrier) and the US will invade Iran, (on behalf of Israel).
    Final link (before Google Books bends to gov’t demands and censors the title):
    America Deceived (book)

    That’s quite a series of claims there. Am I correct in sensing that you are a believer in ZOG (Zionist-Occupied Government)? and if so, could you tell me what you think of the foreign threat to the US and to western democracies? is that all made up to excuse the systematic imposition of a fascist govt on the US?

  11. Loki says:

    While at the same time irredeemably stealing their land? A band aid for a title deed?

    And to step back and look at what each side is doing to each other in brutal or covert ways one can maintain a critical distance that’s necessary to keep a balanced view of whats going on. Sorry but I don’t see that one side is ‘more moral’ or ‘more right’ than the other.
    Ans to suggest that the Israelis don’t dehumanze Palestinians is naive. It suggest to me that you’ve never been to Israel and seen the facts on the ground.

    Of course the Palestinian tactics above are disgusting, but it does not reflect on all Palestinians, you know that. Maintaining a critical distance is necessary in observing any problem as I have learnt on Cyprus in my studies of Greek/Turkish clashes. I really find it disappointing that terms like dupe are used (and terms like relativism are intentionally and expediently misused) because that is not the reason I see for my stance, or my sobriety of critique. I don’t see how taking sides ever worked to solve anything unless genocide is your answer (genocide not just this case but any case if you know what I mean).

    There is also the Nietzsche saying, ‘Those who fight monsters should be careful not to become monsters.’ – that stance does not imply your implied relativism does it? because clearly it implies that I/we do know what is right or wrong. To demonize is to dehumanize, that is the real dupe (to dupe oneself – to sell oneself short in thinking that one is better than the other) as we’ve seen throughout history’s wars, that is wrong. We have to overcome our prejudices, otherwise I could not do ANY meaningful work on Cyprus. A Greek Cypriot was needlessly and callously and barbarically killed in 1996 trying to pull a flag down from a flag pole but amongst others a member of the Turkish Cyptiot government. After my initial revulsion I moved forward. Now I don’t put all Turkish Cypriots on the same level of the killers of 1996. Nor do I forgive these individuals, or groups, or the Turkish Cypriot minister for hospitality for that matter. But groups are not the whole. And I am not an apologist/dupe to Turks or muslims.

  12. Eliyahu says:

    Loki, I live in Jerusalem. I have been living here for years. Nearly everything that the international Judeophobic mafia says against Israel [for example, an "apartheid state"] is a lie. You try to pose a moral equivalence between Arabs and Jews. But there are several problems with your opinions. You seem to have little historical background about Israel and Arab-Jewish relations, in particular, or about the general status of non-Muslims, called dhimmis in Arabic, living in Muslim states. The dhimma system in Islam is humiliating, exploitative [due to special taxes imposed on dhimmis: jizya & kharaj, as well as special exactions due to Muslims taking advantage of the low status of the dhimmis], and oppressive. When dhimmis did not cooperate by paying their jizya they could legitimately be slaughtered, acc’d'g to Shari`ah. Jews have lived in Jerusalem since the end of the Crusades but were always exploited & kept in a state of humility by Muslim rulers up to the British conquest in 1917. Yet, Jews have been the majority here since 1853, at least, acc’d'g to Karl Marx and his source, French historian & diplomat Cesar Famin [search my site]. The British authorities on the ground here in Jerusalem appointed Muslim mayors despite the Jewish majority, and encouraged Arab-Muslim pogroms against Jews here & elsewhere in Israel [i.e., Hebron, Safad, Tiberias, etc.]. Likewise, today the Western powers encourage Arab [Fatah, Hamas, etc] violence against Jews in Israel by means of the huge subsidies that the EU, USA, and Japan pay to the palestinian authority. That the Western “humanitarian” concern for the welfare of these Arabs is fake, is demonstrated by the West’s unconcern over massacres perpetrated by Arabs in the Sudan, where civil wars have gone on from the very beginning of Sudanese independence in 1956, off and on. This indicates to me a non-humanitarian pro-Arab, pro-Muslim attitude on the West’s part.
    Now, you tell me about Cyprus. It’s another example of that policy. The USA & UK acquiesced in the 1974 Turkish invasion of Cyprus. In fact, I met an American working for a “humanitarian” organization who lived in Kyrenia/Girne on Cyprus. He had worked in the State Dept for 29 years. When I met him, not long after the 1974 invasion, he gave me all sorts of reasons to justify that invasion. He was clearly a pro-Turkish partisan. I have to deduce that his stance on Cyprus reflected his State Dept background.
    To conclude, back to Jerusalem. How do you morally equate the acts of deliberate mass murder perpetrated against Israeli civilians by Arab terrorists with Israeli actions that may inconvenience Arabs [and everybody else] or with an Arab sense of humiliation at being forced by Israeli troops to be searched at checkposts, etc?? Or with Israeli actions to arrest or even kill terrorists and their leaders?? Bear in mind that the Arab sense of humiliation is intensified because it comes at the hands of the Jews, so long legally oppressed, exploited and humiliated in lands under Shari`a, including Israel.
    By the way, have you ever heard a loud bomb go off inside a city, a bomb that you later found out killed many people, such as the bomb on Bus no. 1 [2003] where many of the victims were children and babies??? Is it conceivable to you that such bombs are humiliating to us?? They tell us that our lives are worthless, not only to the Arabs but to Western govts and journalists and “humanitarians.”

  13. Loki says:

    I’m not apologizing for terrorists. I take your points Eliyahu. I have been to Jerusalem and Rumulah. I’ve seen Israeli soldiers beat and humiliate Palestinian children before my eyes, but even that is beside the point. What Ive seen is spiralling perpetuation of violence by both sides.

    I am part Greek background, I know about a history of Dhimmidom, of capitation tax. I know there is a parasitical aspect to Islam, esp when taken to the extreme, and today emanating from their culture and their religion which I do not sympathize with. But we can all pick out aspects of the three major religions and say that they are immoral.

    I know the betrayals and the realpolitik of Cyprus. The US? Don’t tell me about the US. The US cannot be pro arab…(though they are pro Turkish and that’s no headline) if they are pro arab they have a funny way of showing it. DO you know how many UN resolutions the US have blocked against Israel? The West is in no way pro Arab and anti Israel. The EU? That is hysterical.
    Why do I equate each sides actions? Because it’s an asymetrical contest….and lets not count the dead, in the end does it matter how they died? Are we looking for a qualitative difference of death?

    The continuing illegal settlements seem a chief source of that anger, what recourse has a Palestinian when a new settlement springs up on his land? The Supreme court? How would that make you feel?

    I’m not apologizing for actions of either side, but I also know its next to futile to attempt to find fault, look at Cyprus again….what good has it done? None. Who has rounded up the bad guys? Nobody. Who are the bad guys? Many, on both sides. I’m looking critically at their actions, trying to ascertain motive that’s all.

    I have not heard a bomb go off, but the day before I was to go to Tel Aviv a bomber attacked a disco there some two years ago.

  14. Eliyahu says:

    Loki, I ought to point out to you that about half of our Jewish population is descended from Jews who lived in Muslim states, from Morocco to Persia, from Yemen to Syria. Many of these Jews remember the humiliations suffered daily by their forefathers in those countries. In some cases they may improperly try to take revenge, their sense of outrage sharpened by the terrorist mass murders, rockets fired into cities, towns and farming villages, and the usual arrogant demeaning talk of Arab and Muslim leaders. A few years ago, a few border guards [Magav] did in fact beat a couple of Arab young men [a phenomenon that I never saw, neither during my army service in Sh’khem (Nablus

  15. Eliyahu says:

    …A few years ago, a few border guards [Magav] did in fact beat a couple of Arab young men [a phenomenon that I never saw, neither during my army service in Sh'khem (Nablus = Neapolis) nor when I spent time in Hebron, Bethlehem, etc]. These Arabs went and complained to Israeli officials. The border guards in this case were sent to the stockade for prolonged periods. It turned out that the father of one of these border guards had been a watchman on a construction site who was murdered by Arabs whom he knew, who worked at the same site. So I don’t know what you saw and I don’t know what preceded what you saw. But Israel does discipline border guards and soldiers who behave improperly.
    Next, you write of “illegal settlements.” This is one of the racist, Judeophobic claims made by political dung beetles like Jimmy Carter. As I wrote previously, Jews owned much real estate in the parts of the Land of Israel conquered by Arab forces in 1948. Among other places, Jews owned homes in Hebron where Jews were massacred in 1929, that is, 19 years before independence. The British authorities at the time acquiesced in or actively encouraged the massacre in Hebron and pogroms against Jews in Jerusalem and elsewhere in the country [see Pierre van Paassen, Albert Londres]. The British removed the surviving Jews from Hebron. Viewing the pattern of attacks and the British role in them, I deduce that the British authorities wanted to get Jews away from the Jewish holy cities and holy places [Hebron, Safed, Tiberias, the Jerusalem Old City, etc] as a matter of policy. Do you deny Jews the right to come back to a Jewish holy city like Hebron after the 1929 British-Arab expulsion of Jews from there? Do you accept as final the Greek expulsion from Smyrna? The Armenian expulsion from Diyarbakir? The near absence of Greeks from Constantinople? Moreover, I pointed out above that all of your so-called “West Bank” was part of the Jewish National Home erected in international law at San Remo in 1920. So what is “illegal” about Jews living in what we call Judea-Samaria? As a rule, Jews have settled on Jewish-owned land and state land in Judea-Samaria, land that properly belongs to the Jewish state envisioned at San Remo and by the League of Nations [see Mandate of 1922].

    Now, you reach the height of silliness when you write: “The US cannot be pro-Arab.” How many times was arafat hosted at the White House? How much money has the USA Treasury contributed to Saudi Arabia and other Arab oil states through favorable tax arrangements for oil companies like ARAMCO working in Arab lands? This money has been called a form of disguised foreign aid by James Ridgway in New Energy [published about 1975]. See: http://ziontruth.blogspot.com/2005/09/kindly-making-arabia-rich.html
    http://ziontruth.blogspot.com/2005/09/what-does-left-really-mean-in-2005.html
    Then you mock my assertion that the EU is pro-Arab. Yet, even the EU admits to being pro-Arab. Haven’t you heard of the book “Chirac d’Arabie” about Chirac’s pro-Arab policy? About Bat Yeor’s book Eurabia on the pro-Arab policy of the EU as a whole? Don’t you know that the EU gives the palestinian authority about 1/2 billion dollars [in euros] every year and raised the amount this year? The USA and Japan give much $$$ to the palestinian authority too. Whereas the USA does give Israel money every year, the EU gives Israel nothing, although the EU is partly responsible –through its funding of the palestinian authority– for the immense suffering of Israelis since the Oslo accords were signed in 1993 and the PA set up in 1994. The EU has not given us even a eurocent, as far as I know, to compensate for the huge medical costs incurred in treating thousands of victims of terrorist attacks in Israel.
    Loki, you really need to study more, learn more, and not believe what you read in the Herald Tribune or the pro-Communist press on Cyprus or the anti-Israel papers in Athens. Your ignorance is profound. Sorry, but I don’t mean to insult you but to inform you.

  16. romablog says:

    I find it hard to believe that there’s no difference between the destructive behaviour of Palestinians, who have grown up in camps and slums and, accordingly, display behaviour that is hostile and self-destructive, and the calculated aggressive policies of the state of Israel?

    i’m confused here. can you spell out the meaning of your statement? RL

  17. Loki says:

    Ok Ill get back to you on all that, but I’m not relying on the ‘herald tribune’, or ‘procommunist’ press in Cyprus of all places? Or the ‘anti Israeli’ papers in Athens…I do have standards you know, however, none of those is how you portray them.

    In the meantime, without the US, Israel would not exist today. So I wouldn’t sell them short.

    As for Smyrna and Istanbul you think that Greece is coveting these places? In what parallel universe? Greece is lucky if it can hang on to what it has got in the long run…

  18. Loki says:

    Like the Finns against the Russians, look how much land was lost there…

  19. Solomonia says:

    Good time had by all…

    …At tonight’s blogger meetup/mini-Thanksgiving at the sea-side residence of the Sisu household. Good company, good food. Nice seeing the Technicalities, Neo-neocon, Augean Stables, Business of Life, and Miss Kelly families…

  20. RL says:

    response to Loki I

    While at the same time irredeemably stealing their land? A band aid for a title deed?
    And to step back and look at what each side is doing to each other in brutal or covert ways one can maintain a critical distance that’s necessary to keep a balanced view of whats going on. Sorry but I don’t see that one side is ‘more moral’ or ‘more right’ than the other.
    And to suggest that the Israelis don’t dehumanze Palestinians is naive. It suggest to me that you’ve never been to Israel and seen the facts on the ground.

    this is bizarre. there’s a huge difference btw the israelis handling of palestinians/arabs in both their media and their schools and vice-versa. what on earth can you find that would compare with what’s documented at PMW

    this is classic “even-handedness” in which you assume both sides must be the same… why?

    Of course the Palestinian tactics above are disgusting, but it does not reflect on all Palestinians, you know that.

    if 70-80% of the palestinian public approve of suicide terrorism and people dance in the streets at the news of israeli civilians ripped to shreds by a palestinian bomb, and attend exhibits where they get to savor these moments recreated in papier-maché, then i’d say that reflects badly on almost all palestinians. you just can’t find parallels among the israelis, and the blank assertion that it must be the same on both sides is just moral equivalence with no data.

    Maintaining a critical distance is necessary in observing any problem as I have learnt on Cyprus in my studies of Greek/Turkish clashes. I really find it disappointing that terms like dupe are used (and terms like relativism are intentionally and expediently misused) because that is not the reason I see for my stance, or my sobriety of critique. I don’t see how taking sides ever worked to solve anything unless genocide is your answer (genocide not just this case but any case if you know what I mean).

    i haven’t studied the greek-turkish conflict, but i must insist that if they are both in the same stew of tribal rivalries, honor-shame vengeance cycles, and nursed hatreds, then it may be (i would say is) inappropriate to make the assumption that the same thing applies to “both sides” of the arab-israeli conflict.

    i use the word dupe for people who believe people who are intentionally misleading them (e.g., a palestinian who believes that “occupied territory” means from the river to the sea, but uses is to get naive outsiders to think it means “beyond the green line”). it’s a fair category, altho obviously not to be used easily.

    and as for taking sides, it’s not always appropriate, but sometimes it is. when fighting an enemy like hamas or global jihad, i’d say taking sides is a moral imperative. if courts took your position, criminals would get away with murder. not to take sides in some cases is to renounce moral judgment, and ends up being a moral failure that encourages violence. if you don’t take side against genocidal forces (check out what the PA has on its TV), then you encourage genocide.

    There is also the Nietzsche saying, ‘Those who fight monsters should be careful not to become monsters.’ – that stance does not imply your implied relativism does it? because clearly it implies that I/we do know what is right or wrong. To demonize is to dehumanize, that is the real dupe (to dupe oneself – to sell oneself short in thinking that one is better than the other) as we’ve seen throughout history’s wars, that is wrong.

    what can i say? israel has fought monsters for all its history without becoming one (not a fraction of the viciousness on the other side) — and yet the world (you apparently included) can’t wait to claim that they have. let me paraphrase Nietzsche: “those who criticize must be careful not to demonize the human and humanize the demonic.” if you are worried about demonizing, worry about the palestinians whose leaders hold them captive to a demonizing discourse that has poisoned their existence. and don’t turn every criticism of the palestinians into demonizing. they are a tragic people, and your thinking contributes to their tragedy.

    We have to overcome our prejudices, otherwise I could not do ANY meaningful work on Cyprus. A Greek Cypriot was needlessly and callously and barbarically killed in 1996 trying to pull a flag down from a flag pole but amongst others a member of the Turkish Cypriot government. After my initial revulsion I moved forward. Now I don’t put all Turkish Cypriots on the same level of the killers of 1996. Nor do I forgive these individuals, or groups, or the Turkish Cypriot minister for hospitality for that matter. But groups are not the whole. And I am not an apologist/dupe to Turks or muslims.

    good for you. just don’t assume that the same dynamics are at work in the arab-israeli conflict. there are literally thousands and hundreds of thousands of israelis ready to do (and doing) the work you call for. it’s a rare still-living palestinian ready to do it.

  21. NaiveAmerican says:

    …at the risk of sounding naive and un-knowledgeable… I find the situation somewhat analogous to America’s blacks and whites in which for hundreds of years blacks slaves built the country with free labor while whites purely profited similiar to the jews who were the majority and owned the land but meanwhile muslims still ruled…what if a country had came in and gave New York to the blacks much like Jerusalem/Israel was given to the Jews I don’t think there would be suicide bombers or things of the sort I know undoubtedly there would be a certain amount of tension and violence but such is the case regardless so this really leads me to believe it has nothing to do with races but cultures as stated above….we as the world should work not on changing all of our cultures so much but more so evolving them to be less prideful and more empathetic…imagine the beautiful piece of land Israel/West Bank could be with muslims and jews and all other cultures not just co-existing but cooperating and living with eachother…history is repeating itself because we keep using the same formula… I pray for the Jews and Palestinians afflicted on both sides it’s a terrible tragedy and another reminder about how far we humans as a species have to go… and don’t insult animals by comparing them to humans, they kill to survive, we do it out of sheer selfishness and ignorance…. peace

  22. [...] Must say, it reminds me of the political cartoon Ellen Horowitz did for me some years back and I posted as part of an essay she had done on the way Arabs project their brutality onto Israelis: [...]

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