Reactionary Modernism in Saudi Arabia: Electronic Trackers for Guardians of Women

In a seminal book about the Nazis, Jeffrey Herf wrote about what he called Reactionary Modernism, that is the combination of fascination with and openness to new technology combined with a regressive politics. People who make the mistake of considering an opening to technology with an openness to modernity may be making a fundamental category error.

In my work, I define “modernity” as the effort to organize polities around the principles of equality before the law. Most other aspects of what we call modernity (and post-modernity) stem from that egalitarian impulse. One of the main points of Bernard Lewis’ analysis in What Went Wrong, is the disconnect between the Muslim desire for Western technology and their inability to adopt the socially egalitarian principles that generated that technology. For those who have not read it, I recommend my father’s chapter on Arab poverty despite their oil wealth in The Wealth and Poverty of Nations

Indeed, the misunderstanding of the “Arab Spring” as a democratic movement was based on the assumption that if the people in the street were using twitter and facebook, then they must be as liberal-minded as college students.

Below, is an article from al Arabiya describing the use of tracking devices to keep track of women who might be acting too independently for the tastes of a culture deeply committed to gender apartheid. (H/T:ES)

‘Where’s my wife?’ Electronic SMS tracker notifies Saudi husbands

Thursday, 22 November 2012

Saudi women’s male guardians began receiving text messages on their phones informing them when women under their custody leave the country. (Photo courtesy: zawaj.com)

Saudi women’s male guardians began receiving text messages on their phones informing them when women under their custody leave the country. (Photo courtesy: zawaj.com)
By AL ARABIYA WITH AFP

Denied the right to travel without consent from their male guardians and banned from driving, women in Saudi Arabia are now monitored by an electronic system that tracks any cross-border movements.

Since last week, Saudi women’s male guardians began receiving text messages on their phones informing them when women under their custody leave the country, even if they are travelling together.
Manal al-Sherif, who became the symbol of a campaign launched last year urging Saudi women to defy a driving ban, began spreading the information on Twitter, after she was alerted by a couple.

The husband, who was travelling with his wife, received a text message from the immigration authorities informing him that his wife had left the international airport in Riyadh.

“The authorities are using technology to monitor women,” said columnist Badriya al-Bishr, who criticised the “state of slavery under which women are held” in the ultra-conservative kingdom.

Women are not allowed to leave the kingdom without permission from their male guardian, who must give his consent by signing what is known as the “yellow sheet” at the airport or border.

The move by the Saudi authorities was swiftly condemned on social network Twitter — a rare bubble of freedom for millions in the kingdom — with critics mocking the decision.

“Hello Taliban, herewith some tips from the Saudi e-government!” read one post.

“Why don’t you cuff your women with tracking ankle bracelets too?” wrote Israa.

“Why don’t we just install a microchip into our women to track them around?” joked another.

“If I need an SMS to let me know my wife is leaving Saudi Arabia, then I’m either married to the wrong woman or need a psychiatrist,” tweeted Hisham.

The trigger

But what provoked the new control method? Local media has reported that controversy caused by the escape of a Saudi woman to Sweden in recent month triggered the move.

The Saudi woman was reported to have converted to Christianity and fled the country, but she denied earlier reports of her conversion and said she wants to return to Saudi Arabia, local daily Al-Yaum reported in July.

The 30-year-old woman also denied that she appeared in a YouTube video posted on July 10 where a veiled woman who was thought to be her claims to have converted to Christianity after having a dream.

“I am a Muslim, I’m fasting in Ramadan and I will not change my religion until judgment day,” she told the newspaper.

The woman said she was facing some family problem when her boss, a Lebanese-national, convinced her that the solution to her problems was to leave Saudi Arabia to a freer country.

“A Lebanese man and another Saudi colleague helped me flee Saudi Arabia to Bahrain, and from there to Qatar before going onwards to Lebanon,” she said. She alleges that when she arrived in Beirut she was taken to a monastery where she was asked to work as a maid.

The woman’s father filed a lawsuit against the two men for helping his daughter leave the country without his knowledge. The Lebanese man was reportedly jailed Monday in the city of Khobar on the eastern coast of Saudi Arabia.

The kingdom applies a strict interpretation of Shariah, or Islamic law, and is the only country in the world where women are not allowed to drive.

No law specifically forbids women in Saudi Arabia from driving, but the interior minister formally banned them after 47 women were arrested and punished after demonstrating in cars in November 1990.

Last year, King Abdullah granted women the right to vote and run in the 2015 municipal elections, a historic first for the country.

In January, the 89-year-old monarch appointed Sheikh Abdullatif Abdel Aziz al-Sheikh, a moderate, to head the notorious religious police commission, which enforces the kingdom’s severe version of sharia law.

Following his appointment, Sheikh banned members of the commission from harassing Saudi women over their behaviour and attire, raising hopes a more lenient force will ease draconian social constraints in the country.
But the kingdom’s “religious establishment” is still to blame for the discrimination of women in Saudi Arabia, says liberal activist Suad Shemmari.

“Saudi women are treated as minors throughout their lives even if they hold high positions,” said Shemmari, who believes “there can never be reform in the kingdom without changing the status of women and treating them” as equals to men.

But the many restrictions on women have led to high rates of female unemployment, officially estimated at around 30 percent.

2 Responses to Reactionary Modernism in Saudi Arabia: Electronic Trackers for Guardians of Women

  1. I think that Dr Landes is just jealous that he cannot enjoy the privileges of Saudi alpha-males, namely, the ability to protect their honor against the possibility of their wives’ indiscretions – after all, what is a man worth if his wife is cheating.

    Importantly, the Saudis have come up with a truly civilized means of wife-control: rather than have to tie them to bed and whip them after the fact, they guard against adultery proactively through their use of technology.

    Or would they whip their wives anyway?

  2. Rich Rostrom says:

    Indeed, the misunderstanding of the “Arab Spring” as a democratic movement was based on the assumption that if the people in the street were using twitter and facebook, then they must be as liberal-minded as college students.

    Dr. Landes, that sort of straw-man creation is beneath you. There may have been a few fools who made that absurdly superficial argument, but no one even slightly serious did.

    Indeed, that claim is not even congruent with your concept of Liberal Cognitive Ethnocentrism – liberals have presumed democratic aspirations among Arabs long before social networking existed.

    There is real evidence of those aspirations (though they are not as powerful as imagined, nor do they conflict with Islamism or Israel-hatred, as many liberals imagine).

    The recent protests against Morsi’s assumption of dictatorial power is such evidence, I think. It is certainly a mistake to think that the Arab Spring is purely a democratic movement; but it is another to say it has no democratic element. Gaddafi, Mubarak, and Assad were all loathed as tyrants – and the people of Libya, Egypt, and Syria were very tired of submitting to their arbitrary rule.

    That nearly all Egyptians wanted to be rid of Mubarak, and to have a say in the government is pretty clear. That many or most of them also wanted an Islamist government does not contradict that. The willful blindness of western observers to the latter is due more to the long-term effects of LCE than superficial observations about Twitter.

    There has been agitation in the Gulf States, Jordan, and Morocco for democratization, which is also part of the Arab Spring.

    Islamists have sought and to a considerable extent have gained control of “Arab Spring” movements, but they did not create the Arab Spring, and it has never been their creature.

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